Why have young people in Japan stopped having sex? | World news | The Observer

Young Japanese are retreating from love and sex, what Japan’s media calls sekkusu shinai shokogun, or ‘celibacy syndrome’:

an excerpt

Japan’s under-40s appear to be losing interest in conventional relationships. Millions aren’t even dating, and increasing numbers can’t be bothered with sex. For their government, “celibacy syndrome” is part of a looming national catastrophe. Japan already has one of the world’s lowest birth rates. Its population of 126 million, which has been shrinking for the past decade, is projected to plunge a further one-third by 2060.

[…]

The number of single people has reached a record high. A survey in 2011 found that 61% of unmarried men and 49% of women aged 18–34 were not in any kind of romantic relationship, a rise of almost 10% from five years earlier. Another study found that a third of people under 30 had never dated at all. (There are no figures for same-sex relationships.) Although there has long been a pragmatic separation of love and sex in Japan — a country mostly free of religious morals — sex fares no better. A survey earlier this year by the Japan Family Planning Association (JFPA) found that 45% of women aged 16–24 “were not interested in or despised sexual contact”. More than a quarter of men felt the same way.

Turning away from the ‘game of life’ in Japan: men working 20 hour days, women trapped at home with children, joyless, stress-loaded meaningless scrambling designed only for the convenience of employers.

Too bad about the sex, though.

Why have young people in Japan stopped having sex? | World news | The Observer

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